Sickie

I do hate being sick. The worst part is when your mind fogs up and you can’t think clearly. I did make it a whole year (technically 14 months) without being sick though, so that is something to celebrate.

Here are my tips for getting over an illness as quickly as possible and trying to keep your germs to yourself:

  • Get rest!
  • Drink fluids
  • Keep tissues nearby to sneeze and cough into
  • Stay in one area and try to keep your germs contained
  • Use hand sanitizer, before entering common areas
  • Take vitamin C
  • Take zinc
  • Take any meds that lessen your symptoms to save the wear and tear on your body
  • Eat homemade chicken soup (I have an easy recipe if you need one. I usually make a ton and freeze it.)
  • Drink hot decaf tea
  • If you have a fever, sweat it out
  • If you are congested, take a steam
  • What do you do when you’re sick?

    Getting a dog?

    Here is some of my basic dog advice, just dispensed to a Twitter pal and thought I’d share it here:

    –Vet–
    We use Laguna Hills Animal Hospital, they are a bit of a drive, but they are excellent! Really sweet people and they love animals. http://www.lagunahillsanimalhospital.com/ (The website is awful, but trust me they’re great!) Highly recommend Dr. Sultzer and Sullos, those are the 2 we’ve seen most.

    –Home Alone–
    I definitely recommend setting up a smaller area to close her up in to start. Once you get an idea of her temperament you can expand that area or let her have the run of the house. Make sure there are no cupboards she can get into with food or cleaning products. No wires, nothing that might fall over and no paper. Also, close her off in her area when you are home too (might be good to leave a bed in there for her all the time), so she gets used to it and doesn’t panic when you put her in there and leave her alone. Try to walk her/exercise her before leaving her alone and always leave her with raw hide or a stuffed kong (best toy ever… http://www.kongcompany.com/worlds_best.html) to keep her busy.

    If she is house-trained she should be able to hold it up to 8 hours, so there is not really a need to put out papers (unless she is paper-trained) but just be ready for anything those first few weeks. And don’t fuss over her when you get home or she might piddle. Take her out right away, then fuss.

    –Food and Treats–
    – We used Iams dry food, that worked pretty well. I think they might even have a doxie formula.
    – Pupperoni (or a piece of one) work great for training, the dogs LOVE them.
    – Milkbones are always safe. (I think of milkbones as cookies and pepperoni as candy, if that makes any sense.)
    – Greenies are good for cleaning their teeth once in a while.
    – Raw hides are good for curbing the chewing (you’ll have to experiment to find out her favorite kind).
    – Baby carrots (1 or 2 per day) are excellent healthy treats.

    We are anti-table scraps, keeping their weight down is important.

    We are also pro crate training at night. You’ll all sleep better.

    The Disneyland Annual Pass Strategy

    If you are looking to buy an annual pass for Disneyland, I’ve found a method that potentially saves money. So here goes.

    1. You don’t buy a pass until you are planning to go to the park anyway. This starts your 365 countdown as late as possible.
    2. You buy a regular one-day admission ticket to one park and upgrade to an annual pass once inside. This way you avoid all the “black-out day” non-sense for your first visit. You will only have to pay the difference between your one-day ticket and the annual pass of your choosing.
    3. Choose the lowest level annual pass available to you, so your upgrade will be less expensive. Note: you can add parking to any annual pass for $60-ish. If you are a couple or family, try just adding parking to one of your passes since you will most likely be together.
    4. If you want to return to the park on a “black-out day”, simply upgrade your pass again to whichever pass will allow your visit. Again, you will only pay the difference between the pass you have and the one you are purchasing.

    With this method, you may be able to avoid the cost of upgrading to a Premium pass, since you may never end up going to the park on a day that is blacked-out anyway.

    Disclaimer: I do not work for Disney, nor do I have insider knowledge regarding their policies. I’ve just had an annual pass for the past 8 years. As far as I know this will work just fine, but there are no guarantees in life. So happy trails!

    For ticket prices etc, visit the Disneyland website: Disneyland.com